Nov 30, 2022  
2018-2020 Graduate School Catalog 
    
2018-2020 Graduate School Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

PhD Industrial and Computational Mathematics, Program Information


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Program Faculty


Department Chair

Asamoah Nkwanta, Ph.D.

Professor

 

Program Coordinator

Xuming Xie

Associate Professor 

Department of Mathematics

Calloway Hall, Room  223

Tel: (443) 885-3890; Fax: (443) 885-8216

E-mail: xuming.xie@morgan.edu

 

Program Faculty

Earl R Barnes, Ph.D.

Visiting Professor 

 

Mingchao Cai, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

 

Marshall Cohen, Ph.D.

Visiting Professor 

 

Iman Dehzangi, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

 

Jonathan Farley, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

 

Xiao-Xiong Gan, Ph.D.

Professor

 

Elisabeth Kemajou-Brown, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

 

Bhamini Nayar, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

 

Gaston N’Guerekata, Ph.D.

Distinguished Professor


 

Asamoah  Nkwanta, Ph.D.

Professor

 

Alexander Pankov, Ph.D.

Professor

 

Dereje Seifu, Ph.D.

Professor

 

James Wachira, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

 

Xuming Xie, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

 

Guoping Zhang, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

 

Najat Ziyadi, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Program Description


The Industrial and Computational Mathematics (ICM) Ph.D. program offers opportunities for candidates to have an in-depth study of mathematics and its applications.  A student admitted to the program will be able to choose his/her field of study in consultation with an ICM graduate faculty member of choice. The Department of Mathematics has faculty members with expertise in real analysis, complex analysis, functional analysis, algebra, combinatorics, differential equations and applications, operations research, numerical analysis, topology, mathematical modeling, mathematical biology, actuarial science, statistics and biostatistics.  The underlying principle of the ICM doctoral program is the fact that solving a problem involving applications requires an in-depth understanding of the mathematical concepts that are to be applied to a corresponding problem.

Program Objectives


The objective of the department’s ICM Ph.D. Program is to produce graduates who are broadly educated in the mathematical sciences and who can work at the current research frontiers of their specialized disciplines, including application of such disciplines to solve problems arising in academia, industry, or government.

General Requirements


credit hours for candidates who already possess the master’s degree (OPTION I) and a minimum of 60 academic credits for candidates only possess the baccalaureate degree (OPTION II); pass a written comprehensive examination, an oral qualifying examination, and the language requirement. All candidates must submit and defend a doctoral dissertation. Candidates must satisfy residency requirements and maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0 throughout the program. A candidate must demonstrate a competent reading knowledge of significant mathematical material in one foreign language by passing two 100-level language classes with a grade of “C” or better (alternatively, the student may take a language competency exam). All requirements for the doctoral degree in Industrial and Computational Mathematics must be completed within a period of seven consecutive years from the date of admission. 

Students may receive “C” grades in no more than 20% of the credit requirement for graduation.  If a student exceeds this credit allowance, the student must retake the same courses with “C” grades until satisfactory grades are earned to bring the student in compliance with the regulation.

Admission


To be eligible for admission to the Doctor of Philosophy Program in Industrial and Computational Mathematics Program an applicant must: 

  • Have earned a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university, preferably in mathematics or related area. 

  • OPTION I: possess a master’s degree with GPA of 3.0 or above from a regionally accredited college or university, preferably in mathematics or related area, or OPTION II: Possess an undergraduate cumulative grade point average (G.P.A.) of 3.0 or better from a regionally accredited college or university, preferably in mathematics or related area

  • Submit an application for admission to the School of Graduate Studies.  All required documents must be submitted as directed by the School of Graduate Studies prior to program review and admission decision.  

  • Use the application system to arrange for three letters of recommendation to be placed with the application.  These letters must be from officials or faculty members of institutions previously attended who are acquainted with the applicant’s ability for graduate study or from employment supervisors where applicable. 

  • Submit a typed exposition regarding the candidate’s personal academic and professional plans and the reasons for selecting Morgan State University. 

  • The Ph.D. admission committee of the department of mathematics will review the application files once they are obtained from SGS. The admission committee makes recommendation to the department for each applicant. 

  • The graduate program director submits the departmental decision for an applicant to the SGS after receiving the recommendation from the admission committee. 

  • The rules for Visa requirements and for English Language Proficiency for foreign students also will be guided by the rules for admission to the School of Graduate Studies at MSU.

 

Meeting the minimum eligibility requirements and submitting all the required documents does not guarantee that an offer of admission will be made to the applicant.  The decision of the Program Admissions Committee involves a review and analysis of all the elements of the application as well as the availability of positions in the program.  The committee then recommends to the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies that an offer admission should be made based on that review.

Candidacy


Students achieve candidacy by successfully completing the core and selective courses with a minimum grade point average of 3.0, passing Comprehensive Examination and the qualifying oral examination and obtaining the consent of a faculty member who will accept the responsibility of directing a dissertation. Prior to achieving Candidacy, the student may enroll in MATH 993  : Pre-Candidacy.

Dissertation Completion


The Ph.D. Dissertation Committee consists of four graduate faculty members, at least one external faculty member from outside of Morgan State University will be selected by the student and his/her dissertation advisor, and approved by the Department Chair and School of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences Dean. Note that lecturers who are approved ICM graduate faculty may serve on a student’s dissertation committee. When the dissertation has been completed to the satisfaction of the candidate’s faculty advisor and dissertation committee, a dissertation defense will be scheduled, at which time the student must orally defend his or her work before the Ph. D. Dissertation Committee, pursuant to the rules and regulations of such activities. The dissertation must contain original, publishable results in the mathematical sciences.

Additional Requirements


Graduate students are cautioned to avoid practices that threaten the integrity of their academic career and their research, including, but not limited to falsification or fabrication of data, violations of privacy and confidentiality provisions, conflicts of interest, cheating, plagiarism, and  copyright infringements. Unethical research threatens the integrity of the academic and scientific enterprise and may subject graduate students to severe penalties. Appeals and due  process will be followed according to the academic regulations of the School of Graduate Studies and the college, school, and department in which they are pursuing a degree.

Program Course Requirements


Option 1


PhD Industrial & Computational Mathematics 

(OPTION I -w/a masters degree: 39 academic credit hours):

 

  • 18 credit hours of  Core Courses 

MATH 505:  Abstract Algebra I 3

MATH 506:  Abstract Algebra II 3

MATH 521:  Real Analysis I 3

MATH 522:  Real Analysis II 3

MATH 541:  Point Set Topology I 3

MATH 542:  Point Set Topology II 3

 

  • 18 credit hours from Elective Courses*

MATH 527:  Complex Analysis I 3

MATH 528:  Complex Analysis II 3

MATH 507:  Ordinary Differential Equations 3

MATH 512:  Probability and Statistics 3

MATH 553:  Computational Mathematics 3

MATH 559:  Numerical Analysis 3

MATH 575:  Introduction to Partial Differential Equations 3

MATH 631:  Biostatistics 3

MATH 635:  Computational Linear Algebra 3

MATH 657:  Finite Element Analysis 3

MATH 663:  Nonlinear Programming 3

MATH 670:  Combinatorial Optimization and Integer Programming 3

 

* NOTE: Other non-core courses may be recommended by the student and faculty advisor as elective courses. The recommended elective course must be approved by the Graduate Program Director and Department Chair.

 

  • 3 credit hours Dissertation

MATH 997/998: Dissertation Guidance / Dissertation Defense 3/9** 

Note


Upon achieving Doctoral Candidacy, the student will continuously register in Fall and Spring terms for MATH 997   (Dissertation Guidance) until the Dissertation is completed and submitted to the School of Graduate Studies for review.  The course is used only when the curriculum has been completed, candidacy has been achieved, and the student is completing the research and writing of the Dissertation. The MATH 997   course registration maintains the student status as a matriculated, full-time student (student is registered for 3 credit hours and the system reports a full-time 9 credit hour load).

After the Intent to Defend the Dissertation form has been received by the School of Graduate Studies, this course registration will be changed to MATH 998   (Dissertation Defense) for the given semester and count for 3 credit hours of curricular coursework (MATH 998   will also count as 9 credits of load).  MATH 997   will not count toward curricular credits. Other courses cannot be substituted for MATH 997   (Dissertation Guidance). The only eligible grade for MATH 997   (Dissertation Guidance) is the grade of “S” and the only acceptable grade for MATH 998   (Dissertation Defense) is “P/F” (Pass/Fail).

Option 2


PhD Industrial & Computational Mathematics 

(OPTION II-w /a bachelors degree: 60 academic credit hours):

 

  • 18 credit hours of  Core Courses 

MATH 505:  Abstract Algebra I 3

MATH 506:  Abstract Algebra II 3

MATH 521:  Real Analysis I 3

MATH 522:  Real Analysis II 3

MATH 541:  Point Set Topology I 3

MATH 542:  Point Set Topology II 3

 

  • 39 credit hours from Elective Courses***

MATH 527:  Complex Analysis I 3

MATH 528:  Complex Analysis II 3

MATH 507:  Ordinary Differential Equations 3

MATH 512:  Probability and Statistics 3

MATH 514:  Applied Combinatorics and Graph Theory 3

MATH 523: Measure Theory 3

MATH 525: Theory of Numbers 3

MATH 551: Algorithms and Computations I 3

MATH 552: Algorithms and Computations II 3

MATH 555: Introduction to Functional Analysis 3

MATH 557: Foundation of Harmonic Analysis 3

MATH 553:  Computational Mathematics 3

MATH 559:  Numerical Analysis 3

MATH 575:  Introduction to Partial Differential Equations 3

MATH 631:  Biostatistics I 3

MATH 631:  Biostatistics II 3

MATH 635:  Computational Linear Algebra 3

MATH 657:  Finite Element Analysis 3

MATH 663:  Nonlinear Programming 3

MATH 670:  Combinatorial Optimization and Integer Programming 3

 

*** NOTE: Other non-core courses may be recommended by the student and faculty advisor as elective courses. The recommended elective courses must be approved by the Graduate Program Director and Department Chair.

 

  • 3 credit hours Dissertation

MATH 997/998: Dissertation Guidance / Dissertation Defense 3/9**** 

Note


Upon achieving Doctoral Candidacy, the student will continuously register in Fall and Spring terms for MATH 997   (Dissertation Guidance) until the Dissertation is completed and submitted to the School of Graduate Studies for review.  The course is used only when the curriculum has been completed, candidacy has been achieved, and the student is completing the research and writing of the Dissertation. The MATH 997   course registration maintains the student status as a matriculated, full-time student (student is registered for 3 credit hours and the system reports a full-time 9 credit hour load).  

After the Intent to Defend the Dissertation form has been received by the School of Graduate Studies, this course registration will be changed to MATH 998   (Dissertation Defense) for the given semester and count for 3 credit hours of curricular coursework (MATH 998   will also count as 9 credits of load).  MATH 997   will not count toward curricular credits. Other courses cannot be substituted for MATH 997   (Dissertation Guidance). The only eligible grade for MATH 997   (Dissertation Guidance) is the grade of “S” and the only acceptable grade for MATH 998   (Dissertation Defense) is “P/F” (Pass/Fail).

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